Fruits of Spring- Watermelon

It is now springtime, dear readers, and that means that many healthy and delicious fruits and vegetables are coming back in season! As we foray our way into the Summer season, I wanted to stop and look at some of the nutritional benefits that some of the in-season fruits have to offer. This week’s fruit to wrap up the mini-series is associated with summer cookouts and celebrations. Let’s pay a quick homage to the watermelon.

 

Origins

The oldest evidence of the existence of watermelon was found in Libya, 2015. Archeologists found watermelon seeds, along with the remnants of other fruit in a 5,000-year-old settlement. The oldest written record of watermelon was dated 4,000 years ago in Egyptian tombs that belonged to pharaohs in that period, indicating that the watermelon served a capacity of cultural significance.

There was no other mention of the watermelon in text or trade logs until about 400BC to 500AD, where it was spread from North Eastern Africa to Mediterranean countries. It spread throughout ancient Greece, Israel, and the Roman empire.

As time passed, the fruit had lost its yellow/orange flesh only to gain a red, much sweeter flesh on the inside due to careful artificial selection, and was eventually traded and spread throughout the rest of Europe. The Bradford strain of watermelon made its way into North America due to efforts a captured military office of the American Revolutionary War, and it became so popular after he started cultivating it in Georgia that people risked their lives to steal the melon for themselves.

I provided the links to the source material in ‘Other Sources’ if you want to learn more in depth about the subject, but suffice it to say, the watermelon has an old and rich history.

Benefits

  • Watermelons are 92% water, meaning that it is a quick way for you to hydrate and to feel full without consuming too many calories
  • They contain lycopene, which helps protect against oxidative damage and inflammation in your eyes.
  • They also contain citrulline, an amino acid that helps reduce muscle soreness.
  • Watermelons also have a surprising amount of vitamin C for a fruit that is not a citrus, 21% of a daily value’s worth to be precise.
  • Watermelon also has Vitamin A, which is an important nutrient that helps in the repair and creation of skin cells.

Recipes

Julia’s Watermelon Gazpacho

 

Contributed to allrecipes.com by Julia Garreaud, a woman from New Hampshire with a passion for cooking, this cold soup has a combination of flavors that are sweet, spicy, and refreshing. Click on the photo above for the link to the recipe.

Summer Shrimp Salad

 

If soup is not your style, how about a salad? This contribution to Real Simple magazine in 2006 by Frances Boswell really puts an inventive spin on both the utilization of watermelon and the concept of a seafood salad. The link for this recipe is in the photo above.

Watermelon Lemonade Slushie

 

 Maybe you aren’t hungry? That’s alright, Food Network has you covered.  This 5-star summer sensation balances the right amount of sweet, sour, and refreshment with this combination of watermelon, lemon juice, and herbs. The recipe link is attached to the photo above.

 

For more healthy lifestyle tips, and good recipes don’t forget to follow:

http://www.beksbites.com/

Other Sources:

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/08/150821-watermelon-fruit-history-agriculture/

http://mentalfloss.com/article/71931/super-sweet-watermelon-has-deadly-history

https://authoritynutrition.com/watermelon-health-benefits/

The Fruits of Spring- Peaches

It is now springtime, dear readers, and that means that many healthy and delicious fruits and vegetables are coming back in season! As we foray our way into the Summer season, I wanted to stop and look at some of the nutritional benefits that some of the in-season fruits have to offer. This week’s fruit is often associated with the state of Georgia, the Peach.

 

Origins

This fruit from the apricot, rose, and almond family was first mentioned and cultivated in Northwestern China at 1000 BC. It found its way through the Persian Empire (now Iran) to India and Rome from 500 to 100 BC, thanks to the Silk Road trade route, and since then it has been known and enjoyed throughout Europe, Asia, Africa, and eventually, North and South America. Culturally speaking, peaches and peach wood in China served as symbols of both vitality and protection against evil spirits.

Benefits

·         Peaches contain vitamin C, a source of strong antioxidants that can both help fight certain formations of cancer cells, (though this is by no means a cure), and help in the reduction of skin damage and wrinkles.

·         Peaches also contain potassium, fiber and choline content that can help reduce the risk of heart disease when combined with a low sodium diet.

·         They have a high alkaline content and enough fiber that helps with overall digestion.

·         They also are a decent source of zinc which has both helps with anti-aging properties and helps with the immune system.

 

Recipes

Tomato and Peach Salad with Almonds

 

 

The contributor of this recipe, Carolyn Malcoun offers a combination of the sour and savory tomato with the sweetness of peaches and honey with a fresh dash of mint. Click on the photo above for the complete recipe.

  

Grilled Chicken Thigh with Peach-Lime Salsa

 

 

Ruth Cousineau, the contributor of this recipe stated that she, “loved the combination of sweet peaches and fiery peppers.” If you wanted to add a little bit of sweetness to a typically spicy dish, check out the recipe by clicking the photo.

 

Copycat Olive Garden Peach Tea

 

 

If you enjoyed the peach tea at Olive Garden and want to try and make it for yourself, then I have some good news! Robin Gagnon of blommi.com created a copycat recipe that will keep you cool and refreshed during the summer season. If you want the recipe, click the photo of the iced tea above.

For more healthy lifestyle tips, and good recipes don’t forget to follow:

http://www.beksbites.com/

Other Sources:

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/274620.php

https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/fruit/health-benefits-of-peach.html

http://quatr.us/food/peaches.htm

 

Fruits of Spring- Pineapple

It is now springtime, dear readers, and that means that many healthy and delicious fruits and vegetables are coming back in season! As we foray our way into the Summer season, I wanted to stop and look at some of the nutritional benefits that some of the in-season fruits have to offer. This week’s fruit is something we all know and love from South America and Hawaii: the pineapple.

Origins

We don’t know much about the original cultivation of the pineapple, but historians have believed that pineapples originated from Brazil and Paraguay in South America. Europeans discovered the pineapple for themselves due during the late 15th century in the Caribbean thanks to Columbus and other Spanish/Portuguese explorers.

Europeans tried to cultivate the fruit in their own countries but quickly learned that the tree cannot sustain itself that well outside of the tropical area it came from, thus making this a rare treat and a status symbol of wealth and royalty. Instead, cultivation came through various Asian and Pacific Island colonies where the modern pineapple grows today.

Benefits

  • Pineapples contain a high amount of vitamin C, which is great for healthy skin and immune function.
  • Pineapples also contain a trace mineral that is essential for the body, manganese.
  • They also consist mostly of water and carbohydrates. They are low in calories, contain mostly insoluble fibers and should not have major effects on blood sugar levels in most people.
  • The stem of the pineapple contains a unique protein-digesting enzyme called Bromelain, which upon study, has been found to have certain benefits, such as a reduction the risk of cancer, improvement gut health and the facilitation of wound healing.

Recipes

 

Sweet and Tropical Flat Belly Salad

 

 

The contributor of this recipe, Jenny Sugar, on Popsugar.com, utilizes pineapple as an ingredient to help fight belly fat, clear your digestive system, and enjoy a cool refreshing taste for those sizzling summer days. The link to the recipe is in the photo above.

  

Pineapple, Fig, and Ginger Chutney

 

According to the contributor of this recipe, Mary Cadogan “The pineapple flavor really comes through in this tangy chutney, making it a perfect accompaniment for ham and all your festive cold meats and cheeses.” The link to this recipe is in the photo above!

 

Pineapple Whip

 

 

  If you have ever been to Disney World or the Dole Plantation in Hawaii, then you know about this amazing sorbet with an ice cream consistency. I am happy to say I found the recipe for it online, thanks to blogger Megan Gilmore. The link to the recipe is in the photo above.

 

For more healthy lifestyle tips, and good recipes don’t forget to follow:

http://www.beksbites.com/

Other Sources:

https://www.puregoldpineapples.com.au/origins/

https://authoritynutrition.com/foods/pineapples/

Fruits of Spring – Lychee

It is now springtime, dear readers, and that means that many healthy and delicious fruits and vegetables are coming back in season! As we foray our way into the Summer Season, I wanted to stop and look at some of the nutritional benefits that some of the in-season fruits has to offer. This week’s fruit is exotic and filled with all sorts of nutritional benefits, so get ready for the Lychee Fruit

Origins

The cultivation of the Lychee was first mentioned in Chinese literature at around 1059 A.D. and has been produced and traded with many other countries with tropical climates, such as Burma, Australia, and even Africa. Descended from the Soapberry family, the Lychee trees have a harvest time of May and June and grows in bunches, with a red rough outer skin hiding the delicious fruit inside.

Benefits

  • Lychee has a lot of dietary fiber, that helps with digestion.
  • It has a high-level of Vitamin C  that meets about 86% of the recommended daily value.
  • The fruit extract has anti-inflammatory benefits, which is great for people who have autoimmune diseases.
  • During an antiviral study, Lychee has been found to have properties that fight against the coxsackie virus (responsible for flu symptoms and infections) and herpes simplex virus.

Recipes

This series of recipes come from a website that is dedicated to sharing lychee based dishes, www.lycheesonline.com. Each recipe utilizes the lychee fruit in an amazingly unique way, that ranges from breakfast dishes to the main course.

 

Roasted Turkey Breast with Lychee Madeira Sauce

  

 

This savory turkey combined with the sweetness of lychee sauce will give you and your family a reason to eat turkey more than once a year! Give it a try and see what you think about this amazing combination! Click on the photo above for a link to the recipe.

 

Lychee Polenta

This interesting combination of both Southern charm and exotic flavor creates a mouthwatering combination that goes great with a cup of coffee in the mornings. Click on the ‘corncake’ above for something a little unique.

 

Stuffed Lychees

  

  

This recipe was contributed by someone in Hawaii, as a fun appetizer for a get-together, combining the sweet flavor of the lychee fruit with just a hint of ginger for spice. Get the recipe linked to the photo above and try it for yourself.

For more healthy lifestyle tips, and good recipes don’t forget to follow:

http://www.beksbites.com/

Other Sources:

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2016/01/18/lychee-health-benefits.aspx

http://foodfacts.mercola.com/lychee.html

https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/fruit/lychee.html

http://wiki-fitness.com/lychee-fruit-health-benefits/

Image Sources:

http://recipeyum.com.au/

http://finecooking.com/

http://farmtotableasiansecrets.wordpress.com/

 

Fruits of Spring – Honeydew

It is now springtime, dear readers, and that means that many healthy and delicious fruits and vegetables are coming back in season! As we foray our way into the Summer Season, I wanted to stop and look at some of the nutritional benefits that some of the in-season fruits has to offer. So, let’s get started and look at the first fruit of this four-week series, honeydew.

Origins

Mentions of the honeydew date back to as far as 2,400 B.C. and was considered a prized delicacy. It was not popular in Europe until its introduction in the French royal court during the 1400’s. It was also thought to have been introduced to the Americas at around the same time when the Spanish began occupying Mexico and the Western part of the modern day United States. Today, the honeydew in the United States is mainly grown in the state of California.

Benefits

  • Because it is technically a melon, it has a high-water content and a low-calorie count
  • Honeydew is surprisingly rich in potassium, which is great for blood pressure levels.
  • It also contains vitamins A, B, and C, which is great for your immune system.
  • This amazing fruit also helps with promoting weight loss, helps with the prevention of diabetes, and has a high enough vitamin and mineral content to be recommended by doctors for pregnant women.

Recipes

In this series, I am going to post four recipes that range from desserts to salads, to even main dishes so that you can have some idea of how to add each fruit into your daily lifestyle with ease.

This week, you can thank allrecipes.com for the wide range of recipes that all utilizes honeydew in a fresh and fun fashion.

 

Prosciutto Wrapped Melon Balls

The author of this recipe ‘RACHELSCHWARTZ’ stated “This is a great snack to make for any gathering. Balls of honeydew melon are wrapped in prosciutto and fresh mint to make a fancy appetizer with few ingredients.”

 

 Click on the photo above if you want the details of this delectable recipe.

 

Cucumber Honeydew Salad

This is an inventive take to an already refreshing fruit with a combination of red onion and cool mint, along with a pinch of salt.

We have ‘spcordell’ to thank for this variation of cucumber salad.

 

Click on the image above for the recipe.

 

Honeydew Juice

JunoirChef was the allrecipes contributor of this refreshing way to enjoy a warm Alabama springtime, and it is a nice break from the everyday sugar filled orange juice in the mornings.

 

Click on the photo above for the recipe.

Eskimo Cubes

Last, but not least, is a melon and berry based ice pop recipe that was contributed by the user SassyCowgirl. Not only does it combine all the fruits of the season, but it also adds a creative flair with the recommendation of ice cube molds to make a variety of fun shapes for the kids.

Click on the photo above for the recipe.

 

For more healthy lifestyle tips, and good recipes don’t forget to follow:

http://www.beksbites.com/

Other Sources:

http://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/features/honeydew-7-healthy-facts#1
http://servingjoy.com/health-benefits-of-honeydew-melon/
http://doctormurray.com/healing-facts-honeydew-melons/

Bek’s Breakfast Banquet- 8/8

When you hear the term “English breakfast” what is the first image that comes to mind? For me, I imagine loads of sausage, bacon, baked beans, fried potatoes and eggs in a plate much too large for the average person. While the prospect of such a breakfast on a daily basis sounds all too tempting, it also sounds like the most dangerous cholesterol trap on the planet.  That combined with America’s love affair with bacon, having any sort of meat for breakfast does seem a little scary.

With that being said, moderation is the key towards any healthy lifestyle and the calories that meats provide does play a part in our brain growth, according to multiple anthropologists, biologists and other scientists in various fields of study. It is also worth mentioning that meat does contain protein, a necessary element in our daily diet.

So, for the final breakfast bite, I have two sausage recipes from Food.com that provide either a leaner alternative to their greasy counterparts or as something to just mix up your morning breakfast meat selection.

Low-Calorie Turkey Sausage Patties

2 Patties per Serving | Yields 4 Servings

© Food.com

Ingredients

  • 1large egg yolk
  • 1teaspoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 1teaspoon sage
  • 12teaspoon ground paprika
  • 12teaspoon salt
  • 14teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 8ounces ground turkey breast

Directions

  1. In a mixing bowl, combine the egg yolk, oil, sage, paprika, salt and pepper with a fork.
  2. Crumble the turkey into the bowl with a fork or clean hands; combine thoroughly.
  3. Shape the ground turkey mixture into 8 patties.
  4. Place the patties in a single layer on plate or work surface.
  5. Coat both sides lightly with vegetable cooking spray.
  6. Heat a large non-stick skillet over medium-high heat.
  7. Place patties in skillet and cook for 3 minutes or until browned.
  8. Flip and cook for about 4 minutes or until cooked through.
  9. Reduce heat if patties are browning too quickly.

Pork Tenderloin Breakfast Sausage

2 Patties per Serving  | Yields 4 Servings

© Martha Stewart

Ingredients:

  • 8 ounces pork tenderloin, ground or 8 ounces ground pork
  • 1 tablespoon minced red onion
  • 12teaspoons minced garlic
  • 12teaspoon dried thyme
  • 14teaspoon ground sage
  • 14teaspoon cayenne
  • 14teaspoon pepper
  • 14teaspoon salt

Instructions:

  1. Mix all of the ingredients in a bowl.
  2. Divide into 4 portions and shape into patties.
  3. For Preparing and Eating Immediately: Cook in non-stick skillet for one to two minutes per side until cooked through. May spray pan with cooking spray if desired.
  4. For Freezing: Can be frozen in individual uncooked portions. I, however, make several batches at once and freeze after being fully cooked.
  5. For Preparing Frozen Patties: Heat up the patties in the microwave either from frozen or thawed out state between a paper towel.

 

 For more healthy lifestyle tips, and good recipes don’t forget to follow: http://www.beksbites.com/

 

Other Sources:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/sorry-vegans-eating-meat-and-cooking-food-is-how-humans-got-their-big-brains/2012/11/26/3d4d36de-326d-11e2-bb9b-288a310849ee_story.html?utm_term=.4e4b809bf2de

http://time.com/4252373/meat-eating-veganism-evolution/

http://www.food.com/recipe/low-calorie-turkey-sausage-patties-204451

http://www.food.com/recipe/biggest-winner-breakfast-sausage-240739

Bek’s Breakfast Banquet- 7/8

Bread has been a staple of the human diet, for over 30,000 years, long before the invention of cereal, smoothies, or omelet. In fact, anthropologists from the National Academy of Sciences discovered traces of starch on stone made mortar and pestles that indicated the practice of grinding grasses and fern roots into an early version of wheat paste. If you want to read the entire article about how bread was invented, I will leave a link in the source list below.

For now, I want to recommend a breakfast staple that has been there for humanity no matter what part of the world we come from and, how much time we have to eat it in the morning. It does not require a bowl or a spoon neither does it require a long cooking time. I am, of course, talking about toast.

Below are two recipes that will get you to revisit the slice of bread that has become a morning habit of many American households.

 

Tostada de Tomate

The original contributor of this Spanish toast recipe was Praveen Kumar, who has also contributed a wealth of international cuisine from places like India, Italy, and other amazing places from all over the world.  This recipe is a great start to rethink the way that you make toast and leaves a fresh taste in your mouth.

 

© Food Network

 

Ingredients:
Brown Bread Slices – 2, thick
Garlic – 1 clove, halved or chopped
Tomatoes – 2, halved, skins removed and pulped
Extra-Virgin Olive Oil – 2 tbsp.
Sea Salt
Mint Leaves – few, chopped, to garnish

Instructions:
1. Toast the bread slices and rub the garlic gently on one side.
2. Pour/Apply the tomato pulp over the bread slices.
3. Drizzle olive oil over the bread.
4. Sprinkle a pinch of salt and serve immediately, garnished with mint leaves.

 

Suji Toast

If you really want to step up your toast game, then how about trying this North Indian and Pakistani dish that is filled with all sorts of vegetables and adds a bit of spice to your mornings.

 

© iFood.TV

Ingredients:
Bread slices – 5
Semolina – 1 cup
Cream – 1 cup
Tomato 2 tbsp, chopped
Onion – 1 tbsp, chopped
Carrot – 2 tbsp, chopped
Cabbage 3-4 tbsp, chopped
BellPeppers – 3-4 tbsp, chopped
Salt and Pepper to taste
Oil – 1 tsp or as required

 

Instructions:
1. Cut the sides of the bread slices and if desired you can give the bread any shape of your choice.
2. Place the Semolina in a bowl, add all the other ingredients except for the oil in the mixing bowl. Stir well.
3. Now apply oil on one side of the bread pieces and spread vegetable mixture on the other side.
4. Heat oil in a pan and fry both sides of each bread slice.

 

For more healthy lifestyle tips, and good recipes don’t forget to follow:http://www.beksbites.com/

 

Other Sources:

http://www.history.com/news/hungry-history/a-brief-history-of-bread

http://www.awesomecuisine.com/recipes/2346/sooji-toast.html

http://www.awesomecuisine.com/recipes/2346/sooji-toast.html

Bek’s Breakfast Banquet- 6/8

The quiche is an interesting dish that originated not in France but in Germany during the 16th century. The word for quiche originated as a derivative of the German word “kutchen” meaning cake. The peasants of France reinvented the dish with the limited ingredients they had on hand during the poor economic times that lead to the French Revolution. The Quiche didn’t make its way to American soil as a breakfast option until the 1950’s where its popularity as an easy meal option, which lasted in bakeries and cafes well into the present day.

Get ready to enjoy a new take on an ever-evolving dish with a healthy spring twist,

Asparagus Quiche with Bisquick Crust

© Joslyn Blair from Delish.com

The original recipe I found was authored by Lauren Haslett, a contributor to www.delish.com from Novi, Michigan, who has a passion for cooking and baking.

TOTAL TIME: 0:35
PREP: 0:35
LEVEL: EASY
YIELD: 5 to 6 SERVINGS

INGREDIENTS

CRUST
  • 1 1/2 c. Bisquick
  • 2 tbsp. all-purpose flour
  • 4 tbsp. unsalted butter, cold, cut into cubes
  • 2 tbsp. shortening (Crisco), cold, cut into cubes
  • 3-4 tbsp. ice water (as needed)
FILLING
  • 4 whole eggs
  • 1 egg white
  • 1/4 c. (2 fluid ounces) heavy cream
  • Kosher salt, to taste
  • Freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 1/4 tsp. nutmeg
  • 1/3 c. ricotta cheese
  • 1/3 c. grated Parmesan
  • 6-7 asparagus spears, rinsed, tough ends removed, and cut into thirds

DIRECTIONS

CRUST
  1. Combine Bisquick and flour in a large bowl. Cut in butter and shortening with a fork or pastry blender until the mixture begins to clump together.
  2. One tablespoon at a time, at the ice water, incorporating thoroughly between each tablespoon and using only enough to bring the dough together. Form dough into a disc, wrap in plastic wrap, and refrigerate at least 30 minutes before baking.
  3. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Roll pie crust out into a circle and transfer to a 9-inch pie dish, pinching cracks or gaps together as needed and pressing it evenly into the pan.
FILLING
  1. Whisk eggs and egg white together, then add the cream, salt, pepper, nutmeg, ricotta, and Parmesan and whisk to combine. Pour filling into crust, then gently place asparagus pieces in a circular formation around the top of the quiche.
  2. Cover the crust edges with aluminum foil and carefully transfer pie plate to oven. Bake about 30 minutes, then remove foil and bake another 5-10 minutes, until filling is set and crust is lightly browned. Let cool at least 15-20 minutes before slicing and serving.

For more healthy lifestyle tips, and good recipes don’t forget to follow:

http://www.beksbites.com/

Other Sources:

http://www.delish.com/cooking/recipe-ideas/recipes/a41797/asparagus-quiche-with-bisquick-crust/

French Culture and History of Quiche

http://www.foodreference.com/html/artquiche.html

Bek’s Breakfast Banquet- 5/8

This Breakfast Bite is coming to you from France with a bit of a twist. Typically made with some form of diced meat, potatoes, and spices, Hash had been popularized in Europe and America mostly during WWII when rationing limited access to fresh meats but it has existed as a concept since the 1700’s at the very least. The word hash was derived from the French word and cooking style, ‘hacher’(hah-shay), meaning ‘to chop’, and has various other names from other parts of the world, such as Austria, Sweden, Denmark, and Malaysia that roughly translates to meaning the same sort of dish.  So, let’s dig in for the latest spin on this traditional dish with

Sweet Potato Apple Hash

This interesting dish combines both “apples of the earth” with apples from the trees, and it is quite simple to make, sweet to taste, and is a great alternative for anyone with sensitivities to things like meat, gluten, or milk products. The original blogger of the recipe comes from HollysHelpings.com, ran by a woman from Phoenix Arizona who posts various recipes online and spends time out of her day designing blogs and web icons for other people.  This recipe was also featured on Huffington Post, which makes this one an “A-Lister” in my book.


Inactive Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 25 minutes
Yield: 2

 

Ingredients:

 

1 Tbsp olive oil

1 sweet potato

1 apple

1/4 onion

1 tsp thyme

1/4 tsp paprika

salt and pepper to taste

 

 

Instructions:

 

Chop the sweet potato and onion.

Peel and core the apple and then chop.

Heat the olive oil in a large pan on a medium-low-setting for a stovetop.

Add the sweet potato, thyme, and paprika and cover, the steam will cook the potato through this way.

Stir occasionally to prevent burning.

Once the sweet potato is almost fork tender, add the apple and the onion.

When the apple and the sweet potato are both soft, remove from heat.

Sprinkle with the salt and pepper and serve.

 

Notes:

If desired, you can add bacon. Simply cook the bacon prior to the sweet potatoes and then cook the rest of the dish in the bacon fat. Add the bacon back in at the end.


For more healthy lifestyle tips, and good recipes don’t forget to follow:

http://www.beksbites.com/

 

Other Sources:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hash_(food)

http://hollyshelpings.com/

 

 

Bek’s Breakfast Banquet – 4/8

It is interesting what people can accomplish when they find a way to overcome a personal obstacle that is either a huge interruption in their daily lives or if it is a minor inconvenience.  In the case of the smoothie, it was a byproduct of a man adapting to his acidity intolerance in South America during the 1920’s. Julius Freed would mix multiple ingredients that would cut the acidity of the oranges and create a frothy foam. It was so popular among his friends and relatives, he eventually founded the first smoothie company, Orange Julius.  The complete history of the smoothie is quite and interesting one and the original article is listed in the source section below.

But I digress, today’s breakfast smoothie recipe is a high protein, low-calorie coffee and whey blend that can make warm spring mornings and hot summer afternoons feel like a treat without feeling deprived and it is a great way to have breakfast on the go without having to cook too far in advance.  This recipe was originally authored by Lilly, the founder and main blogger of the website, listotic.com. Check out some of her other healthy recipes sometime. Until then, enjoy the

 

©Listotic.com

 

SERVINGS:  About 2

INGREDIENTS:

  • About 2 Cups of Ice
  • 3/4 Cup Unsweetened Almond Milk
  • 1 Cup Cold Brewed Coffee (unsweetened)
  • 1 Chopped Frozen Banana
  • 1 Scoop of Protein Powder (Chocolate or Vanilla)

 

INSTRUCTIONS:

Combine all of the ingredients and blend them with your blender until there is a  smooth consistency (It makes it less difficult on the machine and gives you more control of the overall consistency if you add the ice last). Feel free to add a little plain Greek yogurt or peanut butter if you think it is not rich enough.

 

TIPS:

  • You can also puree this recipe (with an unfrozen banana), and pour it over ice. Keep in mind that this will lower the servings.
  • Don’t be afraid to experiment and add some of your own favorite ingredients (unsweetened cocoa powder, Greek yogurt, flax meal, coconut milk, oatmeal, chia seeds, peanut butter, etc.)
  • Be sure to use a protein powder that you love. If you find the protein powder taste to be a little overwhelming, try using just 1/2 a scoop, and add a little plain Greek yogurt.
  • Use more or less banana depending on how sweet you would like your drink (the frozen banana also makes it a lot creamier– closer to a shake than a smoothie). When I really want to treat myself, I use 2 frozen bananas.
  • Because this energy-boosting shake only has about 115 calories per serving, don’t be afraid to add a little plain Greek yogurt or peanut butter to the recipe if you want to drink it as a meal replacement.

 


 

For more healthy lifestyle tips, and good recipes don’t forget to follow:

http://www.beksbites.com/

 

Other Sources:

http://www.listotic.com

     http://www.healthysmothiehq.com